These blog items are where individuals/s have asked to develop an action such as a petition by collaborating to achieve a successful action.

All snaring to be banned

Another aim from the manifesto which scores highly.

This derives from the article "Is shooting out of control?" on Page 35 of the extended manifesto and on this website  here which says:

" All forms of snaring should be outlawed immediately in line with most other European Countries. In 2012 a government study found that only 32% of the animals trapped in snares were the intended targets – normally foxes. The remaining 68% caught, severely injured or killed in these nooses included hares, badgers, family cats and dogs, deer and even otters. It is estimated that snares may trap up to 1.7 million animals every year. The House of Commons debated the use of snares in July 2016 and MPs advocated a ban. However, the government ignored the vote and pushed ahead with the introduction of a revised voluntary code of practice. A study by the shooting industry revealed that less than half of the gamekeepers polled had ever read the code. Currently 77% of the British public think snares should be illegal and 68% of MPs also support a ban on snares.The UK is one of only 5 of the 28 EU member states where snaring is legal. "

The code referred to is different in the different legislative areas in the UK. They need to be dealt with individually.

Scotland.

(with thanks to snarewatch for the information). Anyone setting a snare in Scotland must inspect it (or cause it to be inspected), at least once every day at intervals of no more than 24 hours to see whether an animal is caught in it and to ensure that it is free-running. Any captured animal must be released or removed, regardless of whether it is alive or dead. Snares may only be set with the landowner’s or occupier’s permission.

These provisions were re-stated in s.13 of the Wildlife and Natural Environment (Scotland) Act 2011 (the WANE Act), along with provisions for user training and requirements for identification tags on snares set for foxes, rabbits or brown hares.

The Snares (Training) (Scotland) (No 2) Order 2012, allows gamekeeping industry bodies and four Scottish colleges to deliver training on the use of snares in Scotland, and the Snares (Identification Numbers and Tags) (Scotland) Order 2012 requires snare users to have approved accreditation and received a personal identification number from the Police.

The book by Alan Stewart, 'Wildlife and the Law' covers the issue in Scotland in much greater detail, but the issue here is not what is presently legal, it is how it may be banned, and the applicable legislation needed to effect the ban.

This is, armed with the above documentation, rather simple. 

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 states, amongst other requirements for snares, :

"11 Prohibition of certain methods of killing or taking wild animals.

(1)Subject to the provisions of this Part, if any person—

(a) sets in position or otherwise uses any self-locking snare or a snare of any other type specified in an order made by the Scottish Ministers;

(aa) sets in position or otherwise uses any other type of snare which is either of such a nature or so placed (or both) as to be calculated to cause unnecessary suffering to any animal coming into contact with it;...he shall be guilty of an offence. "

The modification required is simply a deletion to say"

"11 (a) sets in position otherwise uses any snare ;....he shall be guilty of an offence."

Armed with the wording of the manifesto and the simple change, it would be surprising if any environmental chariry would oppose the petition, and most will support. MSPs might also be supportive, but those who view any wildlife not needed on an estate as 'vermin' will likely be strongly opposed. There are far more discriminating, and which cause less pain to wildlife, pets or non targeted  species, methods available to those who still wish to remove particular species from an area.

The wording of the Scottish petition is quite important, and needs time to consider.

England and Wales

 Having first considered the Scotland position, the E&W position becomes easier.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 states :

"11 (1)Subject to the provisions of this Part, if any person—

(a) sets in position any self-locking snare which is of such a nature and so placed as to be calculated to cause bodily injury to any wild animal coming into contact therewith;... he shall be guilty of an offence."

We only need to delete the words "self-locking", and any other reference to snares, such as the checking of the snares, and any other regulations etc, but that need not concern the petition.

Northern Ireland

There exists the The Snares Order (Northern Ireland) 2015. However, as long as elected politicians prefer that there is no elected assembly sitting to coming to an agreement I do not think there is much point, unless the E&W petition succeeds, when an NI petition to the UK parliament might succeed, as many NI politicians are not embracing democracy.

Suggested petition wording to the UK government for England and Wales:

 Ban the use of all snares in England and Wales.

 All forms of snaring should be outlawed immediately in line with most other European Countries. In 2012 a government study found that only 32% of the animals trapped in snares were the intended targets – normally foxes. The remaining 68% caught, severely injured or killed in these nooses included hares, badgers, family cats and dogs, deer and even otters. It is estimated that snares may trap up to 1.7 million animals every year. The House of Commons debated the use of snares in July 2016 and MPs advocated a ban. However, the government ignored the vote and pushed ahead with the introduction of a revised voluntary code of practice. The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 should be revised in 11(1) (a) to be  "sets in position any  snare which is of such a nature and so placed as to be calculated to cause bodily injury to any wild animal coming into contact therewith"

Suggested wording for Scotland

 Ban the use of all snares in Scotland.

All forms of snaring should be outlawed immediately in line with most other European Countries. In 2012 a government study found that only 32% of the animals trapped in snares were the intended targets – normally foxes. The remaining 68% caught, severely injured or killed in these nooses included hares, badgers, family cats and dogs, deer and even otters. It is estimated that snares may trap up to 1.7 million animals every year. The government is Scotland has made the use of snares subject to additional requirements. However, this petition suggests that they be banned completely.

The Wildlife and Countryside Act 1981 should be revised in 11(1) (a) to be  "sets in position otherwise uses any snare" and (aa) removed.

 

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Friday, 23 August 2019